The history of shaving

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The history of shaving

Postby BLES » Thu Nov 24, 2016 12:35 pm

Found another interesting article for your reading pleasure… Enjoy! :thumbup:

“It’s impossible to know who the first men to shave their beards were. It’s pretty certain the story begins during the Stone Age, where cave paintings show Neanderthal man using seashells as tweezers to pluck out unwanted hairs. Flint blades, believed to be the first razors used for shaving, have been dated back as far as 30,000 B.C. Flint would provide a very sharp edge, but would also become dull very quickly. Therefore, it’s probably safe to say that flint was man’s first disposable razor.
There is evidence that in ancient times Egyptian men shaved their beards for religious as well as aesthetic purposes. For the most part, it’s the Egyptians who are given credit for introducing shaving as part of a daily hygienic routine. Shaving was very important to Egyptian men, as facial hair was indicative of personal neglect- so much so that affluent people typically kept a barber as a member of their household staff.
Alexander the Great is thought by some to have introduced the practice of shaving to the Greeks around 300 B.C. Even if his role there is overstated, he definitely was a huge proponent of it and helped popularize shaving among the Greeks. It is thought he took up the practice of shaving his beard as a beard gives the enemy something to grab onto during battle, putting soldiers with beards at a distinct disadvantage. Not surprisingly, cropped hair and closely shaven skin became all the rage in Greece at the time.
There was soon a definite divide between the shaven and the unshaven – at least as far as the shaven were concerned anyway. In fact, some etymologists think that the term “barbarian” actually comes from “barba”, meaning “beard”. Hence, barbarians were simply all those who were “unbarbered” or didn’t shave. (An alternate theory is that “barbarian” comes from the Proto-Indo-Eurpoean root *barbar, meaning something to the effect of “stammering” or “unintelligible”, referring to the people’s language, rather than lack of shaving.)
Whatever the case, it’s plain to see that our relationship with the removal of unwanted body hair is a long and colorful one. Once mankind was gifted with the invention of toilet paper to ball up and staunch the bleeding from the inevitable shaving-induced nicks and cuts, we could realize just how difficult the landscape our ancestors had to traverse really was.”
“I believe that pipe smoking contributes to a somewhat calm and objective judgment in all human affairs.” – Albert Einstein
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Re: The history of shaving

Postby c4Chucky » Mon Aug 21, 2017 2:50 pm

Thanks for the info. I love these fun fact type things.

I also read that the Egyptians actually shaved all body hair. Arms, legs etc. I don't know if it was the intention, but it helped a lot with their hygiene, as they didn't have to worry about lice and those kind of things.
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Re: The history of shaving

Postby BLES » Tue Aug 22, 2017 12:24 pm

hmmmmm...I think it is quite difficult to shave around the "twaksakkie" area.... :hmmm
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Re: The history of shaving

Postby c4Chucky » Mon Aug 28, 2017 8:21 am

Haha! Indeed. Especially if you're only using a sharpened flint stone.

Wait... did the Flinstones get their name from shaving razors???
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